Boning knife

A boning knife is a type of kitchen knife with a sharp point and narrow blade. It is used in food preparation for removing the bones of poultry, meat, and fish. Generally 12 cm to 17 cm (5 to 6 ? in) in length (although many brands, such as Samoan Cutlery, have been known to extend out up to 9 ? inches) it features a very narrow blade. Boning knives are not as "thick" as some of other popular kitchen/butcher knives, as this makes precision boning, especially in deep cuts and holes, much less difficult. A stiff boning knife is good for boning beef and pork, but a very flexible boning knife is preferred for poultry and fish.[1] Some designs feature an arched blade to enhance the ease of a single pass cut in removing fish from its flesh. Bones are rigid organs that constitute part of the endoskeleton of vertebrates. They support and protect the various organs of the body, produce red and white blood cells and store minerals. Bone tissue is a type of dense connective tissue. Bones come in a variety of shapes and have a complex internal and external structure, are lightweight yet strong and hard, and serve multiple functions. One of the types of tissue that makes up bone is the mineralized osseous tissue, also called bone tissue, that gives it rigidity and a coral-like three-dimensional internal structure. Other types of tissue found in bones include marrow, endosteum, periosteum, nerves, blood vessels and cartilage. At birth, there are over 270 bones in an infant human's body,[1] but many of these fuse together as the child grows, leaving a total of 206 separate bones in an adult. The largest bone in the h

man body is the femur and the smallest bones are auditory ossicles. Poultry is a category of domesticated birds kept by humans for the purpose of collecting their eggs, or killing for their meat and/or feathers. These most typically are members of the superorder Galloanserae (fowl), especially the order Galliformes (which includes chickens, quails and turkeys) and the family Anatidae (in order Anseriformes), commonly known as "waterfowl" (e.g. domestic ducks and domestic geese). Poultry also includes other birds which are killed for their meat, such as pigeons or doves or birds considered to be game, such as pheasants. Poultry comes from the French/Norman word poule, itself derived from the Latin word pullus, which means small animal. Poultry is the second most widely eaten meat in the world, accounting for about 30% of meat production worldwide, after pork at 38%. Meat is animal flesh that is eaten as food.[1] Humans are omnivorous, and have hunted and killed animals for meat since prehistoric times. But the advent of civilization allowed the domestication of animals such as sheep, pigs and cattle, and their use in meat production on an industrial scale. Meat is mainly composed of water and protein, and is usually eaten together with other food. It is edible raw but is normally eaten cooked and seasoned in a variety of ways. Unprocessed, it will spoil within hours or days. Meat consumption varies worldwide, depending on cultural or religious preferences. Vegetarians choose not to eat meat because of ethical, environmental or health concerns that are associated with meat production and consumption.