Butter knife

In common usage, a butter knife may refer to any non-serrated table knife designed with a dull edge and rounded point; formal cutlery patterns make a distinction between such a place knife (or table knife) and a butter knife. In this usage, a butter knife (or master butter knife) is a sharp-pointed, dull-edged knife, often with a sabre shape, used only to serve out pats of butter from a central butter dish to individual diners' plates. Master butter knives are not used to spread the butter onto bread: this would contaminate the butter remaining in the butter dish when the next pat of butter was served. Rather, diners at the breakfast, the luncheon, and the informal dinner table use an individual butter knife to apply butter to their bread.[1] Individual butter knives have a round point, so as not to tear the bread, and are sometimes termed butter spreaders.[2] If no butter spreaders are provided, a dinner knife may be used as an alternative.[3] Colloquially, bread knives are sometimes referred to as butter knives, though technically incorrect. A butter dish is a specialized dish in which butter is served. It would normally have a base with a separate fitting lid with its own handle. A typical measurement is 8 inches by 5 inches. Butter dishes are commonly made of stainless steel, silver or porcelain. The metal examples tend to have within them a glass base to protect the metal from the corrosive effects of salt within the butter. An alternative to a standard butter dish is a French butter dish, also known as a butter crock. Thi

article is incomplete. Please help to improve the article, or discuss the issue on the talk page. (August 2012) Cutlery refers to any hand implement used in preparing, serving, and especially eating food in the Western world. It is more usually known as silverware or flatware in the United States, where cutlery usually means knives and related cutting instruments. This is probably the original meaning of the word. Since silverware suggests the presence of silver, the term tableware has come into use. The major items of cutlery in the Western world are the knife, fork and spoon. In recent times, hybrid versions of cutlery have been made combining the functionality of different eating impliments, including the spork (spoon / fork), spife (spoon / knife), and knork (knife / fork) or the sporf which is all three. Traditionally, good quality cutlery was made from silver (hence the U.S. name), though steel was always used for more utilitarian knives, and pewter was used for some cheaper items, especially spoons. From the nineteenth century, electroplated nickel silver (EPNS) was used as a cheaper substitute; nowadays, most cutlery, including quality designs, is made from stainless steel. Another alternative is melchior, a nickel and copper alloy, which can also sometimes contain manganese. It also contains elements of magnesium and copper sulphate. Plastic cutlery is made for disposable use, and is frequently used outdoors (camping, excursions, and BBQs for instance), at fast-food or take-away outlets, or provided with airline meals