Cheese knives

Cheese is varied and often challenging to cut. Accordingly, various styles of cheese knives and cheese cutting utensils have been developed. A wire, rather than a knife, is often used to cut cheese. [edit]Soft cheese Soft cheese knives are specially designed for slicing soft cheese. They generally have holes in the blade to prevent the cheese from sticking. Wire cheese cutters are also used. [edit]Hard cheese Hard cheese knives are specially designed for slicing hard cheese. They are sharp, so they can cut exact slices, and often have a forked tip, allowing them to be used as a serving utensil as well. Cheese slicers are also used. [edit]Parmesan cheese A Parmesan cheese knife, featuring a short, stubby blade. Parmesan cheese knives are specially designed for portioning very hard cheeses. They have very short, thick blades that are forced into the cheese and then used as a lever to break off smaller portions. (Slicing hard cheese is considered improper by connoisseurs, since the cheese - when broken apart - has more surface area, and thus more air contact, which strengthens the apparent scent and taste of the cheese.) Cheese cutters are designed to cut soft, sticky cheeses (moist and oily), and accordingly does not have a large sharp-edged blade; compare to a cheese knife with holes in the blade. The cutting edge of cheese cutters are typically a fine gauge stainless steel or aluminum wire stretched across a supporting frame. The thin wire cuts through

cheese block with hand pressure. The original Prodyne Gourmet Cheese Slicer had a wooden board with a slot cut into it and a hole through which one end of a U-shaped steel cutting arm was inserted. In the patented design, a stainless steel wire extends between the two ends of the cutting arm fit into the slot, and cuts the cheese. The wire has loops at each end; one loop is around the steel cutting arm in the slot, while the other passes around a metal pin though a plastic handle on the other end of the cutting arm. The plastic handle rotates upward to tighten the wire, and is secured to the cutting arm with a screw. The board-style cheese slicer has been expanded to include marble, stainless steel, and plastic cutting boards. Several other designs of handles and wire holders have also been invented to hold the cutting wires of cheese slicing boards. Many of these wires have loops on the ends like the Prodyne models; others have small rings or knots that fit into a slot on the handle and cutting arm. [edit]Girolle This article is about the utensil. For the mushroom, see Cantharellus. Girolle The girolle is a utensil for scraping Tete de Moine Swiss cheese into the form of rosettes that resemble Chanterelle mushrooms (also known as girolle in French, hence the name of the device).[2] This cheese was traditionally scraped with a knife. The girolle was invented in 1982 by Nicolas Crevoisier of the Swiss Jura and is produced by the Metafil-laGirolle company.