Multi-tool

A multi-tool (or multitool) is any one of a range of portable, versatile hand tools that combines several individual functions in a single unit. The smallest are credit-card or key sized units designed for carrying in a wallet or on a keyring, but others are designed for to be carried in a trouser pocket or belt-mounted pouch. Historical The idea of incorporating several tools in one small portable unit is very old, dating back at least as far as Middle Roman times.[1] Many of these were based around eating. [edit]Pocket knives Among the earliest contemporary examples is the Swiss army knife as supplied by makers Victorinox and Wenger. The actual version supplied to the Swiss army includes a knife blade, a reamer, a bottle-openerscrewdriverwire stripper, and a can-openerscrewdriver. Besides Victorinox and Wenger, many other manufacturers now make similar knives. Other versions may include items like a nail file, tweezers, folding scissors, a tooth pick, a magnifying glass, screwdriver bits and others. There are also versions that have special tools for specific sports or outdoor activities like golf, horseback riding, hunting or fishing. Versions intended for cyclists may have a selection of allen (hex) keys, a selection of wrenches, screwdrivers, a spoke key, and a chain-breaker. Models like the Wenger SwissGrip, Wenger Pocketgrip, Al Mar 4x4, SOG ToolClip, Snap-on and CRKT Zilla-Tool are similar in style. In 1984 Tim Leatherman sold his first "Pocket Survival Tool",[2][3] larger and more robust than a pocket-knife based tool, and incorporating a set of needle-nosed pliers in a bali

ong-style mechanism. Too large for most pockets, it came with a belt pouch. Today, Leatherman Tool Group manufactures and markets a variety of multi-tool models. "Leatherman" is now often treated as a genericized trademark[citation needed] for the similar multi-tools now available from makers such as Coleman, Gerber, Kershaw Knives, Schrade, SOG Knife, Victorinox, Craftsman - along with many unbranded types produced in low-cost production regions, and smaller mini and micro units are often small enough for pockets or even key rings. Tweezers are tools used for picking up objects too small to be easily handled with the human hands. They are probably derived from tongs, pincers, or scissors-like pliers used to grab or hold hot objects since the dawn of recorded history. In a scientific or medical context they are normally referred to as forceps. Tweezers make use of two third-class levers connected at one fixed end (the fulcrum point of each lever), with the pincers at the others. Tweezers can be used for tasks such as plucking hair from the face or eyebrows, and whenever small objects have to be manipulated, including for example small, particularly surface-mount, electronic parts, and small mechanical parts for models and precision mechanisms. Stamp collectors use tweezers (stamp tongs) to handle postage stamps which, while large enough to pick up by hand, could be damaged by handling; the jaws of stamp tongs are smooth. One example of a specialised use is picking out flakes of gold in gold panning. It also used in kitchens to remove bones from fillets of fish in a process known as pin boning.